The Joy of Nothingness: A Murky Coast Swim

Sometimes it’s about the nothingness. The no way. The no doing. Non-being.

There’s an unrealistic expectation that every time you enter the water that a bewildering spectacle of marine life is right there for you to swim through.

Propagated by sensationalist images on media of incredible interactions, once-in-a-lifetime observations, must-see experiences, it’s an illusion of the actual randomness and sometimes sleepiness of real marine excursions.

Often there is just nothingness. But in its own way that nothingness transports us towards immersing in vacancy, in allowing space to be a thing. In the same way that no response is a response. In that non-decision is a decision, non-action is action.

By allowing ourselves to live in a void and not have the constant need to fill it, with stimulus, with content, with ambition, with anything other than the bare soul of ourselves, that perhaps is easier to avoid than sit with for a mere few minutes of our day.

To avoid this need to chase. To expect that every immersion will result in something tangible. The mere presence of being there, present in nothingness, that is attraction in itself. To be removed from the race. To restore and recharge on pause. I know no greater gift than this void.

Nothingness – it’s one of life’s great underrated pleasures.


Joy of Nothingness: A Murky Mornington Peninsula Coast Swim – About The Video

Not every day is clear, calm and safe to enter the water where the waters of Bass Strait meet the coastline of the Mornington Peninsula.

Sometimes the swell and waves are too big, or the wind makes it too choppy. The tidal ebb and flow has an influence on the particles suspended in the water which changes the visibility, which makes it challenging around the rocks, gullies and coastal shelves that provide so much interest.

This ocean beach is marked by a small sandy beach with significant coastal shelves, hidden bommies and multitudes of submerged protrusions. It is rare to have the ideal conditions to swim freely here, maybe only 4-5 days per year.

With the right approach and a sense of reservation, it’s possible to enjoy the shoreline despite the strong undertow and sidesweep, waves pounding, and vegetation that is floating about.

It’s a messy existence in the murky and disturbed waters, but one that provides a different beauty in it’s perceived nothingness.

Thanks for watching.

Water Temperature: 13c

Filmed on Nikon AW130 underwater compact camera
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Edited on @Adobe Creative Cloud Lightroom and Premiere Rush.
Music: Knowpe by Noir Et Blanc Vie

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Marlon Quinn
Marlon Quinn

Former IT stakeholder manager, now sea-changer, RIB pilot, freediving instructor, cyclist, wild swimmer and evolving creative.

Published by marlonquinn

Marlon Quinn Love of the sea Freedom of movement Simple Living

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