Freedive Excursion – Point Cooke

To The Homestead

With the Mornington Peninsula drawing most of the attention, a couple of freedive buddies recently found good reason to travel west in search of marine entertainment.

Coerced by the power of adventure we prepared to visit the Point Cooke Marine Sanctuary near Point Cook around 30 minutes from Melbourne CBD.

Sometimes you harbour an inkling about the future. This premonition was that the dive spot would be mostly sandy muck, murky with visibility bordering on atrocious.

Sometimes you’re wrong. This time it was right.

Driving towards the Homestead launch point, the clouds closed in, the ominous signs of disaster loomed. Not really, but that’s powerful dramatic imagery.

Point Cook Homestead and Cafe

Point Cook Homestead and Cafe

As gravel crumpled under the tyres, the fever grew. The arrival at the Homestead is quite intriguing, a cafe awaits along with very active noisy geese and an assortment of other farm-type animals, including tourists such as ourselves.

Walking by the cafe in full neoprene regalia, long fins, flapping dive flag and cool looking weight belts we probably looked a little out of place. Sheep made noises.

Needless, the water beckoned.

A metropolitan style immersion.

A metropolitan style immersion.

What stumped us most was the unfamiliar view of the city towers stalking the skyline. It was a spectacular sight and one worth repeating.

Entering the shallow 16c water, we knew not what was underneath.

Flanked by fins, the Melbourne CBD.

Flanked by fins, the Melbourne CBD.

Expectations met, the visibility was woeful. Unperturbed we went about exploring the area, checking out underwater rock features, plant life, the odd fish and the visibility that was pushing hard to get to 2 metres.

The milky playground found us a couple of hundred metres from shore in about 5m depth. The murk meant that every plunge was a lottery.

Southern Sand Flathead

Southern Sand Flathead

As the sun descended and temperatures in and out dropped, we aimed for shore. For sure.

It was then that the fun began. Surrounded by hundreds of blubber jellyfish we had our own Palau-esque Jellyfish Lake experience.  Riding the current the squadrons of blubber made their way along the coastline across our exit path. A tremendous sight these pulsing beasts mostly coordinated in their approach. The occasional protestation of directional capability seemingly all part of the roam towards their ultimate drift destination.

Blue Blubber Jellyfish

Blue Blubber Jellyfish

This stampede of tentacles and large head-borne crosses slowed us as we bumped through the parade.

20140420 Point Cooke 1

Arriving at shore, who would have known better than the orchestrated welcoming song of the geese?

Then, the clouds lifted and the sky was blue. Visibility returned anew.

Thanks to my accomplices on the day, Denise and Mona.

The blue sky returns at the Point Cooke Homestead

The blue sky returns at the Point Cooke Homestead

Point Cook Homestead Road

Point Cook Homestead Road

The entourage of Blubber Jellyfish

The entourage of Blubber Jellyfish

Crossing the Jellyfish divide

Crossing the Jellyfish divide

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